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APPLICATIONS OF MICROHEATER/RESISTANCE TEMPERATURE DETECTOR AND ELECTRICAL/OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF METALLIC NANOWIRES WITH GRAPHENE HYBRID NETWORKS

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thesis
posted on 16.12.2020, 19:00 by Doosan Back
A microheater and resistance temperature detector (RTD) are designed and fabricated for various applications. First, a hierarchical manifold microchannel heatsink with an integrated microheater and RTDs is demonstrated. Microfluidic cooling within the embedded heat sink improves heat dissipation, with two-phase operation offering the potential for dissipation of very high heat fluxes while maintaining moderate chip temperatures. To enable multi-chip stacking and other heterogeneous packaging approaches, it is important to densely integrate all fluid flow paths into the device. Therefore, the details of heatsink layouts and fabrication processes are introduced. Characterization of two-phase cooling as well as reliability of the microheater/RTDs are discussed. In addition, another application of microheater for mining particle detection using interdigitated capacitive sensor. While current personal monitoring devices are optimized for monitoring microscale particles, a higher resolution technique is required to detect sub-micron and nanoscale particulate matters (PM) due to smaller volume and mass of the particles. The detection capability of the capacitive sensor for sub-micron and nanoparticles are presented, and an incorporated microheater improved stable capacitive sensor reading under air flow and various humidity.
This paper also introduces the characterization of nanomaterials such as metallic nanowires (NWs) and single layer graphene. First, the copper nanowire (CuNW)/graphene hybrid networks for transparent conductors (TC) is investigated. Though indium tin oxide (ITO) has been widely used, demands for the next generation of TC is increasing due to a limited supply of indium. Thus, the optical and electrical properties of CuNW/graphene hybrid network are compared with other transparent conductive materials including ITO. Secondly, silver nanowire (AgNW) growth technique using electrodeposition is introduced. A vertically aligned branched AgNW arrays is made using a porous anodic alumina template and the optical properties of the structure are discussed.

Funding

DARPA-BAA-12-50

NSF 1408346

Alpha Foundation (AFC518)

History

Degree Type

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Campus location

West Lafayette

Advisor/Supervisor/Committee Chair

David B. Janes

Additional Committee Member 2

Dimitrios Peroulis

Additional Committee Member 3

Peter Bermel

Additional Committee Member 4

Alexandra Boltasseva