Purdue University Graduate School
Browse

File(s) under embargo

Reason: Journal publication

4

month(s)

4

day(s)

until file(s) become available

Evaluating the efficiency of general purpose and specialized game engines for 2D games

thesis
posted on 2024-04-24, 19:44 authored by Thomas Michael Brogan IIIThomas Michael Brogan III

In the ever-changing landscape of game development, the choice of game engine plays a critical role in deciding the efficiency and performance of a game. This research paper presents a comparative analysis of the performance benchmarks of large general purpose game engines, specifically Unreal Engine 5, Unity, and Godot, versus small genre-specific engines in the context of a simple 2D projectile dodging game. The study focuses on two-dimensional games, which are particularly popular with small studios and indie developers. All three general purpose engines evaluated claim to support building both 2D and 3D applications, however since 2D game logic tends to be smaller scoped and more compact such games are impacted greater by any overhead and bloat the engine introduces, which this research paper intends to evaluate. A series of controlled experiments are conducted to assess each engine's performance in processor utilization, power consumption, memory usage and storage space requirements.

History

Degree Type

  • Master of Science

Department

  • Computer Graphics Technology

Campus location

  • West Lafayette

Advisor/Supervisor/Committee Chair

Dr. John Springer

Additional Committee Member 2

Dr. David Whittinghill

Additional Committee Member 3

Dr. Tatiana Ringenberg