2021.7.15 Pilsun Yoo.pdf

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INVESTIGATION OF CHEMISTRY IN MATERIALS USING FIRST-PRINCIPLES METHODS AND MACHINE LEARNING FORCE FIELDS

thesis
posted on 22.07.2021, 01:30 by Pilsun Yoo
The first-principles methods such as density functional theory (DFT) often produce quantitative predictions for physics and chemistry of materials with explicit descriptions of electron’s behavior. We were able to provide information of electronic structures with chemical doping and metal-insulator transition of rare-earth nickelates that cannot be easily accessible with experimental characterizations. Moreover, combining with mean-field microkinetic modeling, we utilized the DFT energetics to model water gas shift reactions catalyzed by Fe3O4at steady-state and determined favorable reaction mechanism. However, the high computational costs of DFT calculations make it impossible to investigate complex chemical processes with hundreds of elementary steps with more than thousands of atoms for realistic systems. The study of molecular high energy (HE) materials using the reactive force field (ReaxFF) has contributed to understand chemically induced detonation process with nanoscale defects as well as defect-free systems. However, the reduced accuracy of the force fields canalso lead to a different conclusion compared to DFT calculations and experimental results. Machine learning force field is a promising alternative to work with comparable simulation size and speed of ReaxFF while maintaining accuracy of DFT. In this respect, we developed a neural network reactive force field (NNRF) that was iteratively parameterized with DFT calculations to solve problems of ReaxFF. We built an efficient and accurate NNRF for complex decomposition reaction of HE materials such as high energy nitramine 1,3,5-Trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX)and predicted consistent results for experimental findings. This work aims to demonstrate the approaches to clarify the reaction details of materials using the first-principles methods and machine learning force fields to guide quantitative predictions of complex chemical process.

History

Degree Type

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Materials Engineering

Campus location

West Lafayette

Advisor/Supervisor/Committee Chair

Peilin Liao

Advisor/Supervisor/Committee co-chair

Alejandro Strachan

Additional Committee Member 2

Haiyan Wang

Additional Committee Member 3

Jeffrey P. Greeley