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PULLED IN TWO DIRECTIONS: UNCOVERING ANTECEDENTS AND OUTCOMES OF EMPLOYEE CSR ATTITUDES

thesis
posted on 2023-04-26, 23:07 authored by Julia M StevensonJulia M Stevenson

  

Prior research assumes that employees have positive attitudes toward corporate social responsibility (CSR) and are affected positively by their organization’s CSR practices. However, given the sometimes controversial and paradoxical nature of CSR, assuming purely positive attitudes may be overly simplistic. To challenge this assumption, I examine CSR attitudes to illuminate various views employees may hold toward CSR. To do so, I first develop measures of CSR Attitudes that includes four subscales to assess the extent to which employees hold positive, negative, ambivalent, or indifferent attitudes toward CSR. Next, drawing on social information processing theory, I examine subjective (ethical climate perceptions and CSR attributions) and objective (CSR messages) social information antecedents to employee CSR attitudes. Further, I examine behavioral (physical withdrawal, in-role and extra-role CSR performance, and helping behaviors) and cognitive (psychological withdrawal, volunteering intent, and perspective taking) responses to CSR attitudes. I also consider two relevant individual differences that affect these pathways. To test my hypotheses, I conducted an experimental vignette study to test the relationship between subjective and objective social information antecedents and the full range of CSR attitudes. Additionally, I conducted a field study to test the full model presented in this dissertation. Results demonstrate mixed support for hypotheses. However, strong support was found for the positive effect of values-driven CSR attributions on employee positive CSR attitudes. Further, positive CSR attitudes were found to relate to the prosocial behaviors of extra-role CSR behaviors and volunteering intent. Lastly, CSR ambivalence related to both positive and negative employee outcomes, demonstrating that CSR ambivalence may be more complicated than extant ambivalence research would suggest.

History

Degree Type

  • Doctor of Philosophy

Department

  • Management

Campus location

  • West Lafayette

Advisor/Supervisor/Committee Chair

Brian R. Dineen

Additional Committee Member 2

Kelly Schwind Wilson

Additional Committee Member 3

Jordan Nielsen

Additional Committee Member 4

Meredith Woehler

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