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RISK OF QT INTERVAL PROLONGATION, VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA AND SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST ASSOCIATED WITH QT INTERVAL PROLONGING DRUGS IN PATIENTS WITH HEART FAILURE WITH PRESERVED EJECTION FRACTION

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posted on 2022-07-28, 21:08 authored by Chien-Yu HuangChien-Yu Huang

  

Background: 

Torsades de pointes (TdP) is a polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT) associated with heart rate-corrected QT interval (QTc) prolongation on the electrocardiogram (ECG). TdP can cause sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), a catastrophic outcome. The antiarrhythmic drugs dofetilide and sotalol can cause QTc prolongation and arrhythmias, as can more than 200 other medications available on global markets. Heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is a risk factor for drug-induced TdP, and HFrEF heightens sensitivity to drug-induced QTc lengthening. However, ~55% of patients with HF have preserved, rather than reduced, ejection fraction. It remains unknown whether patients with HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) are at increased risk for drug-induced VT/SCA. Assessment of the risk of drug-induced VT/SCA in HFpEF patients is important, so that recommendations can be made regarding the safety of QTc-prolonging drugs and need for enhanced ECG monitoring in this population. 

Objective:

In aim 1, we sought to determine the risk of VT and SCA associated with dofetilide and sotalol in patients with HFpEF. In aim 2, we were able to use QTc interval to determine the odds of dofetilide/sotalol-associated QT interval prolongation in patients with HFpEF. In Aim 3, we investigated the influence of HFpEF on VT and SCA associated with a broader group of drugs known to cause TdP (“known “TdP drugs”), as designated by the QT drugs list at www.crediblemeds.org. 

Methods:

In aim 1, we used Medicare claims (2014-2016) and ICD-9/10 codes to identify patients taking the QT interval-prolonging drugs dofetilide or sotalol, which are used commonly in patients with HF and atrial fibrillation, as well as non-dofetilide or sotalol users among 3 groups: HFpEF, HFrEF, and no HF. Multinomial propensity score-matching was performed. Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel statistics and standardized differences were used to compare baseline characteristics. A generalized Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and test the association of VT and SCA among dofetilide/sotalol users, HFpEF, HFrEF, and no HF.

In Aim 2, the data source was electronic health records from the Indiana Network for Patient Care (February 2010 to May 2021). After removing patients with overlapping diagnoses of HFpEF and HFrEF, no diagnosis code, absence of QT interval records, and no validated record of using dofetilide or sotalol, we identified patients taking dofetilide or sotalol among three groups: HFrEF, HFpEF, and no HF. Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel statistics were used to compare baseline characteristics. QT interval prolongation was defined as heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) > 500 ms during dofetilide/sotalol therapy. Unadjusted odds ratios (OR) of QT interval prolongation were determined by univariate analysis, and adjusted ORs were determined by generalized estimating equations (GEE) with logit link to account for an individual cluster with different times of hospitalization and covariates.

In aim 3, we used Medicare enrollment in fee-for-service medical and pharmacy benefits (2014 to 2016) and ICD-9/10 codes, we identified patients taking drugs known to cause torsades de pointes (TdP drugs; www.crediblemeds.org) and non-TdP drug users among three groups: HFrEF, HFpEF, and no HF. Multinomial propensity score-matching was performed to minimize baseline differences in covariates (patient demographics, comorbidities, health care utilization and drug history). Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel statistics and standardized differences were used to compare baseline characteristics. A generalized Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate HRs and test the association of VT and SCA among TdP drug users with HFpEF, HFrEF, and no HF.

Results:

In Aim 1, VT and SCA occurred in 166 (10.68%) and 16 (1.03%), respectively, of 1,554 dofetilide/sotalol users with HFpEF, 543 (38.76%) and 40 (2.86%) of 1,401 dofetilide/sotalol users with HFrEF, and 245 (5.06%) and 13 (0.27%) of 4,839 dofetilide/sotalol users with no HF. The adjusted HR for VT in patients with HFrEF was 7.00 (95% CI 6.12-8.02) and in patients with HFpEF was 1.99 (1.71-2.32). The risk of VT associated with dofetilide/sotalol was increased across the overall study population (HR: 2.47 [1.89-3.23]). Use of dofetilide/sotalol increased the risk of VT in patients with HFrEF (HR: 1.53 [1.07-2.20]) and in those with HFpEF (HR: 2.34 [1.11-4.95]). However, while the overall risk of SCA was increased in patients with HFrEF (HR: 5.19 [4.10-6.57]) and HFpEF (HR: 2.53 [1.98-3.23]) compared to patients with no HF, dofetilide/sotalol use was not significantly associated with an increased risk of SCA.

In Aim 2, QTc prolongation associated with dofetilide/sotalol occurred in 51.2% of patients with HFpEF, 70.1% of patients with HFrEF, and 29.4% of patients with no HF. After adjusting for age, sex, race, serum potassium and magnesium concentrations, kidney function, concomitant drug therapy, and comorbid conditions, the adjusted odds of having QTc interval larger than 500ms during the hospital stay were 5.23 [3.15-8.67] for HFrEF and 1.98 [1.17-3.33] for HFpEF with no HF as the reference group. 

In Aim 3, of 23,910 known TdP drug users with HFrEF, VT and SCA occurred in 4,263 (17.8%) and 493 (2.1%) patients, respectively. In comparison, among 31,359 known TdP drug users with HFpEF, VT and SCA occurred in 1,570 (5.0%) and 340 (1.1%) patients. VT and SCA occurred in 3,154 (0.8%) and 528 (0.1%) of 384,824 known TdP drug users without HF. The overall HR of both VT and SCA was increased in patients with HFrEF (HR: 7.18 [6.13-8.40])  and in those with HFpEF (HR: 2.09 [1.80-2.42]). The risk of VT associated with known TdP drugs was increased across the overall population (HR: 1.34 [1.20-1.51]). Use of known TdP drugs significantly increased the risk of VT and SCA in patients with HFrEF (HR: 1.34 [1.07-1.67]), but not in patients with HFpEF.

Conclusion:

HFpEF may exhibit an enhanced response to drug-associated VT, and is associated with a higher risk of drug-associated QTc interval prolongation. Further study is needed to identify methods to minimize this risk for patients with HFpEF requiring therapy with dofetilide, sotalol, or drugs known to cause TdP. 

History

Degree Type

  • Doctor of Philosophy

Department

  • Pharmacy Practice

Campus location

  • West Lafayette

Advisor/Supervisor/Committee Chair

James E. Tisdale

Additional Committee Member 2

Kevin M. Sowinski

Additional Committee Member 3

Brian R. Overholser

Additional Committee Member 4

Zeruesenay Desta