Disstertation

Reason: Publishing

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year(s)

10

month(s)

5

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Reconceptualizing Power in American Politics: Black Women Lawmakers, Intersectional Resistance, and Power

thesis
posted on 28.07.2021, 02:39 by Guillermo A CaballeroGuillermo A Caballero

My dissertation is an exploratory study examining the power dynamics that Black women lawmakers navigate in Georgia General Assembly. My project focuses on re-conceptualizing power in legislative studies by centering on the lived experiences of Black women lawmakers. I build on previous work to develop my theory of intersectional resistance. I defined intersectional resistance as individuals with intersectionally marginalizing identities pushing back on behaviors, events, and norms that attempt to marginalize them or their constituents to advance their agenda in the state legislature.

History

Degree Type

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Political Science

Campus location

West Lafayette

Advisor/Supervisor/Committee Chair

Nadia E. Brown

Additional Committee Member 2

Valeria Sinclair-Chapman

Additional Committee Member 3

Rosalee Clawson

Additional Committee Member 4

Natasha Behl