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THE DEVELOPMENT, FEASIBILITY, AND ACCEPTABILITY OF AN ECOLOGICAL MOMENTARY INTERVENTION TO PREVENT SEXUAL VIOLENCE REVICTIMIZATION

thesis
posted on 2024-05-04, 03:10 authored by Molly MaloneyMolly Maloney

Introduction: Sexual violence (SV) is a major concern for college women, with serious consequences for survivors, their families and communities, and society. Women experiencing SV are significantly more likely to experience future instances of violence, such that most campus SV occurs among a small group of women who experience multiple assaults. Reducing rates of SV revictimization is therefore a public health priority. However, theoretically-driven, empirically-based SV prevention programs are lacking, particularly for college women with a history of SV. To our knowledge, no studies have evaluated the effectiveness of an ecological momentary intervention (EMI), or intervention that offers support to survivors ‘in-the-moment,” despite theory and evidence to suggest that this may be a promising approach for reducing revictimization. Method: Using a cultural adaptation model—ADAPT-ITT (Wingood & DiClemente, 2008)—the present study adapted empirically supported techniques (ESTs) for SV prevention to 1) be used with survivors of SV, and 2) delivered as EMIs in moments of risk for SV revictimization. Six stakeholders (two stakeholder groups) and 31 college women with a history of sexual violence and past month risky sexual behavior and harmful alcohol use, were recruited. In Phase 1, participants completed SV prevention needs assessment via focus groups and surveys. In Phase 2, participants reviewed selected intervention materials, completed a brief pilot of the intervention, and provided feedback via focus groups and surveys. Results: Participant needs assessment supported adaptation of an SV revictimization prevention EMI focused on alcohol-, risky sexual behavior-, and SV protective behavioral strategies (PBS) with the addition of a brief motivational interview (BMI) and SV revictimization prevention psychoeducation. Participant feedback indicated acceptability and perceived effectiveness of the proposed intervention. Quantitative findings suggested good compliance with the intervention and associated behavioral change. Participant feedback also indicated several areas in need of improvement, including content, tone, and logistics. Conclusion: The present research demonstrates that feasibility, acceptability, and perceived effectiveness of a novel SV revictimization program, including EMI, BMI, and psychoeducation. Findings also underscore the effectiveness of involving the target population and community stakeholders in intervention adaptation and/or development.

Funding

International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health

Purdue University Kinley Trust

History

Degree Type

  • Doctor of Philosophy

Department

  • Psychological Sciences

Campus location

  • West Lafayette

Advisor/Supervisor/Committee Chair

Christopher I. Eckhardt

Additional Committee Member 2

Jennifer L. Brown

Additional Committee Member 3

Susan C. South

Additional Committee Member 4

Sean P. Lane

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